Hummer H1, H2, & HMMWV Duramax Conversions

Predator Inc. Duramax Conversions

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The Duramax

Predator Diesel Engines are the next step in the evolution of diesel turbo vehicles. Predator Duramax Engines are built for extreme terrains and field-proven with enhanced engine performance. The Duramax Power Train conversion begins by removing the OEM engine and replacing the OEM setup with a Duramax 6.6L Engine (LMM or LBZ series). The turbo setup on these engines utilize a Garrett VVT (variable vane turbocharger) and air-to-air intercooler allowing instant boost with minimal turbo lag throughout the entire power band. Each engine is equipped with our Predator Raptorq ECM upgrade, delivering apx. 465HP and 1100 foot lbs of torque.

RAPTORQ ECM

Our unique proprietary & copyrighted Predator RapTorq ECM was engineered over a 18 month span with specific testing and development by our in-house engineering team. Our RapTorq ECM programming provides rapid throttle response from light-throttle to full heavy-throttle performance power. In conjunction with power gains, Fuel Economy is also improved on an average of 10-20% throughout all operational conditions. The primary goal was to create superior drivability with a maximum power curve within the exhaust-gas temperature limits.

Predator Quality
Made in America

Predator Inc. is pleased to know that through our continues efforts and core-value of “Made in the USA,” is not just a tagline, but a means for knowing that we strive to produce and offer a high-standard of excellence!

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Predator Built
Duramax Engines

Predator Diesel Engines are the next step in the evolution of diesel turbo vehicles and built for enhanced performance and designed to exceed all expectations.

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    6.6L DURAMAX LMM SPECS

  • Engine:
    6.6L Duramax LMM, 90 degree V8 diesel
  • Years Produced:
    2007.5 - 2010
  • Displacement:
    403 cubic inches, 6.6 liters
  • Head/Block Material:
    Aluminum cylinder heads, cast iron engine block
  • Compression Ratio:
    16.8 : 1
  • Bore:
    4.06 inches
  • Stroke:
    3.90 inches
  • Aspiration:
    Turbocharged & intercooled - Garrett VVT (variable vane turbocharger), air-to-air intercooler
  • Injection:
    Direct injection, 26,000 psi Bosch high pressure common rail with CP3 injection pump
  • Valvetrain:
    OHV (overhead valve), 4 valves per cylinder
  • Emissions Equipment:
    • Diesel Particulate filter (DPF); minimizes particulate emissions
    • Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR); reduces NOx emissions
    • Diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC); converts carbon monoxide into CO2 & water

The LMM made its debut midway into the 2007 model year, phasing out the previous generation LBZ. The new diesel particulate system required "active regeneration" in order to periodically clean the DPF by means of literally burning the collected material. The LMM used a less favorable late and post injection technique in order to introduce raw diesel fuel into the diesel particulate filter, which is necessary to inhibit the high temperatures necessary for regeneration to occur. The late and post injection technique, as opposed to the "9th injector" technique, poses the threat of cylinder washing and fuel dilution as a result of raw diesel fuel passing through the cylinder on its journey to the exhaust system. The "9th injector" system, which would be adopted by the current LML Duramax, is considered favorable and eliminated these concerns. The typical response to abnormally high fuel dilution is to make sure that maintenance is performed regularly per the owners manual. The threat has yet to surface as a serious cause for concern, at least in the short run, despite criticism.

The LMM offered a slight increase in horsepower (+5) and torque (+10) over the LBZ. However, in GMC and Chevrolet class 4/5 trucks (4500/5500 models) the Duramax LMM was available in either a 300 hp/520 lb-ft or 330 hp/620 lb-ft version. The 2500/3500 Van variation of the engine made 250 hp/460 lb-ft of torque and mated to GM's HydraMatic 4L85-E four speed automatic transmission instead of the Allison 1000. Detuning is common in commercial vehicles. 2010 was the last model year that the LMM was available, as it was replaced by the more powerful, more efficient LML for the 2011 model year.

 

    6.6L DURAMAX LBZ SPECS

  • Engine:
    6.6L Duramax LBZ, 90 degree V8 diesel
  • Years Produced:
    2006 - 2007
  • Displacement:
    403 cubic inches, 6.6 liters
  • Head/Block Material:
    Aluminum cylinder heads, cast iron engine block
  • Compression Ratio:
    16.8 : 1
  • Bore:
    4.06 inches
  • Stroke:
    3.90 inches
  • Aspiration:
    Turbocharged & intercooled - Garrett VVT (variable vane turbocharger), air-to-air intercooler
  • Injection:
    Direct injection, 26,000 psi Bosch high pressure common rail with CP3 injection pump and 7 hole fuel injectors
  • Valvetrain:
    OHV (overhead valve), 4 valves per cylinder
  • Emissions Equipment:
    Diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR)

The LBZ was relatively short lived, having been available for only two model years for no concise reason other than its replacement, the LMM, was capable of meeting stricter emissions regulations rolling into effect near the time of its retirement. Mechanically, the LBZ is nearly identical to the 2006 model year LLY. However, the LBZ features more aggressive engine tuning, yielding a substantial increase in horsepower and torque over its predecessor. The LBZ produced 360 horsepower and 650 lb-ft of torque to the LLY's 310 horsepower and 605 lb-ft. By mid-model year for 2007, the LBZ was effectively replaced by the emissions compliant, diesel particulate filter equipped LMM.

The 6.6L Duramax LBZ's applications included the Chevrolet Silverado HD, GMC Sierra, HD, Chevrolet Kodiak, and GMC TopKick (the Kodiak and TopKick being medium duty truck models. In the aftermarket, the LBZ is thought of the "hot rod" for its huge performance potential, abundance of support, and the fact that it is the last model produced without a diesel particulate filter. Information released by General Motors at the introduction of the LBZ state that the engine has an increased piston pin diameter and thicker connecting rod section over previous generations in addition to an improved block casting.

The LBZ was available mated to either the Allison 1000 six speed automatic or the ZF650 six speed manual transmission. 2007 would mark the last model year that any Duramax engine was available with a manual transmission. The Duramax LBZ was produced from 2006 to 2007 model years, with the LMM replacing it by mid-2007.